Top Ten Essential Architecture top Paris Churches  
     
  For a more complete list, see Paris Main List  
1 Notre Dame Cathedral  
021B.jpg (69534 bytes)

architect

Maurice de Sully

location

Address: Parvis de Notre Dame. 75004 Paris, France.
Telephone: 43.26.07.39  (on the Ile de France)

date

1163 to 1250

style

Gothic

construction

cut stone. Road distances in France are measured from the "0 km" point on the square. 

type

Church

Notre Dame de Paris (French for "Our Lady of Paris", meaning the church in Paris dedicated to the Virgin Mary), often known simply as Notre Dame in English, is a gothic cathedral on the eastern half of the Île de la Cité in Paris, France, with its main entrance to the west. While a major tourist destination, it is still used as a Roman Catholic cathedral (archbishop of Paris). Notre Dame de Paris is widely considered the finest example of French gothic architecture.
 
     
2 Mont Martre  
030a.jpg (48158 bytes)

architect

Paul Abadie

location

Montmartre, Paris.

date

1876 to 1912

style

Romanesque Revival

construction

white marble

type

Church

Basilica of the Sacré Cœur was built on Montmartre from 1876 to 1912 by public subscription as a gesture of expiation after the defeat of 1871 in the Franco-Prussian War. Its white dome is a highly visible landmark in the city, where just below it artists still set up their easels each day amidst the tables and colorful umbrellas of Place du Tertre.
At the beginning of his political career, the future French statesman Georges Clemenceau (1841–1929) was mayor of Montmartre.
 
     
3 la Sainte-Chapelle  
015-ste-chapelle-above.jpg (53838 bytes)

architect

unknown 

location

Located in the heart of Paris, slightly west of Notre Dame, on Michel Bd. du Palais au Change. 

date

1238 to 1244

style

French Court Gothic

construction

masonry 

type

Church built for King Louis, later sainted. 

La Sainte-Chapelle (French for The Holy Chapel) is a Gothic chapel on the Ile de la Cité in the heart of Paris, France. It is perhaps the high point of the full tide of the rayonnante period of Gothic architecture.

It was planned in 1241, started in 1246 and quickly completed: it was consecrated on April 26, 1248. The patron was the very devout Louis IX of France, who constructed it as a chapel for the royal palace. The palace itself has otherwise utterly disappeared, leaving the Sainte-Chapelle all but surrounded by the Palais de Justice, which carries on a single function of the palace, which was the site of the king's lit de justice where important aristocrats pled their cases before the king.
 
     
4 St. Louis des Invalides  

architect

Jules Hardouin Mansart

location

metro stations: Invalides, Latour-Maubourg or Varenne. 

date

1676 to 1691

style

French Renaissance

construction

masonry

type

hospital chapel Church

Les Invalides in Paris, France consists of a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement containing museums and monuments, all relating to France's military history, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose. It is also the burial site for some of France's war heroes.
 
     
5 Church of Saint-Sulpice  
The interior of the Church

architect

Christophe Gamard, Louis Le Vau and Daniel Gittard, but the work was completed by Gilles-Marie Oppenord, a student of François Mansart

location

on the east side of the Place Saint-Sulpice, in the Luxembourg Quater of the VIe arrondissement.

date

1646-1776

style

French Baroque

construction

stone

type

Church

The present church is the second building, erected over an ancient Romanesque church originally constructed during the 13th century. Additions were made over the centuries, up to 1631. The new building was founded in 1646 by parish priest Jean-Jacques Olier (1608-1657) who had established the Society of Saint-Sulpice, a clerical congregation, and a seminar attached to the church.
 
     
6 Pantheon in Paris  
023B.jpg (70227 bytes)

architect

Jacques-Germain Soufflot

location

Place du Pantheon, 75001 Paris, France.Telephone, 43.54.34.51.

date

1756 to 1797

style

French Baroque

construction

masonry, domed

type

Church

The Panthéon is a building in the Latin Quarter in Paris, France. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve, but after many vicissitudes now combines liturgical functions with its role as a famous burial place. It is an early example of Neoclassicism, with a façade modelled on the Pantheon in Rome, surmounted by a small dome that owes some of its character to Bramante's "Tempietto". Located in the Ve arrondissement on the top of Montagne Sainte-Geneviève, the Panthéon looks out over all of Paris.
 
     
7 Basilique Saint-Denis  

architect

Abbot Suger (1081-1155)

location

Saint-Denis, now a northern suburb of Paris.

date

1136

style

Rayonnant Gothic. The church is an architectural landmark as it was the first major structure partially built in the Gothic style , although only part of the original Gothic ambulatory at the chevet, or east end remains.

construction

masonry. The church is also important architecturally due to the fact that it is considered the first church built in the Rayonnant style.  Among other innovative features at St. Denis are the stained glass windows in the chevet, the rose window on the facade, and the statue columns (now destroyed but known from Montfauchon's drawings) flanking the portals on the west facade.

type

Church
 
     
8 Cathedral of Chartres  

architect

various

location

located in Chartres, about 80 km from Paris

date

1140

style

Gothic

construction

stone

type

Church

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 80 km from Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture.
Chartres is a cathedral that inspires superlatives, and there are few architectural historians who have not waxed lyrical about its soaring aisles and delicate carving. These tributes are richly deserved, for Chartres is truly one of the greatest of all French Gothic cathedrals. From a distance it seems to hover in mid-air above waving fields of wheat, and it is only when the visitor draws closer that the city comes into view, clustering around the hill on which the cathedral stands. Its two contrasting spires — one, a 105 metre (349 ft) plain pyramid dating from the 1140s, and the other a 113 metre (377 ft) tall early 16th century Flamboyant spire on top of an older tower — soar upwards over the pale green roof, while all around the outside are complex flying buttresses.